Laukaz

Cognate: German, Lauch ('leek'); English, leek. Under its Old Norse form (Lagu), it means 'water' and it is therefore related to the French, lac, (lake) (the word 'lac' comes from Latin, and is not directly related to Lagu), and therefore it is also related to English lake (which was borrowed from French).
Derolez cites a large number of variants for this rune, found in some 15 manuscripts. All are variants of "lagu" (lago, laga, or lac). Some variants might be misspellings, but even those staying near this form mean water. It is however well-known that "a few early examples of the name form certainly resemble 'laukr'", as Page stated. To be more precise, in the oldest recorded appearance of the rune's name, viz. in Codex Leidensis of the 10th century, the name of this rune is 'laukr' which means 'leek', and has the Proto-Germanic root *laukaz. For the complete discussion on this topic, see the last section in our Derolez page in the runic inscriptions.
The grapheme for Laukaz is , and always has been.

 

Texts linked to Laukaz

 

The saying of Völsi

lini goeddr, en laukum studdr.
Wrap with linen and preserve with leek.

Viking Rune Poem

logr (water) is where a cascade
falls from a mountain-side;
but ornaments are made of gold.

Icelandic Rune Poem

Logr (water) is welling stream
and broad geyser
and land of the fish.

Old English Rune Poem

Lagu (water) seems interminable to men,
if they are obliged to venture out in a tossing vessel,
and the sea-billows terrify them exceedingly,
and the sea-steed will not respond to the bridle.

Old English Rune Poem, as translated by Marijane Osborn

Water to landsfolk is a long thought
if they must go on the galloping ship,
and high waves scare them half to death,
and the home of the sea heeds not his bridle.

Fifteenth Runic Stanza of the Havamal

I know a fifteenth, that first Thjodrerir
Sang before Delling's doors,
Giving power to gods, prowess to elves,
Fore-sight to Hroptatyr-Odin.

Runes of Protection
Sigrdrifumal

Edda version

Thor's sign must be traced on the cup
And to protect from evil
Throw an onion into the drink;
Then, I know that evil never Mixes with mead.

Volsung's saga version
For the cup shall you make a sign
And be wary of misfortune
And throw leek into the liquor.
Then, I know that, you will never get
A potion blended with poison.

It is engraved... on glass...

Busla’s First Curse

Let tutelary spirits loose their way
Let violence reign,
Let stones stagger,
Let the world tremble,
Let a new climate begin,
Let calamity reign.

 


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